House Rules to Look Out for Part II: Restrictions on Doubling Down

We all know to keep an eye out for blackjack games that allow us to double down on any pair. This is a player friendly rule, allowing you to double your bet when it looks like you just might beat the dealer. So why would you avoid a table that still allows you to double down even if you can’t double down on any two cards?

The answer comes down to the math on the odds. In a typical blackjack game, the house odds are around .5%. You might think that even being allowed to double down only on cards totaling 10 or 11 is still a pretty good deal. But really it’s not. In the blackjack games that only allow you to double on 10 and 11 totals is a game that is increasing the house edge. The edge will jump from around .5 to around .75. Defiantly not in your favor.

The reason this favors the house more is because you have more of a chance of busting on those hands. Imagine doubling on a total of 11. There are only twenty four cards out of fifty two that won’t bust you—and all twenty four cards may not be available for play either having already been played or are in other players hands. So you double down on your total of 11 and are dealt an 8. You just gave the dealer, ergo the casino, more money than is necessary!

If the point of blackjack is for you to make money, don’t give it away by playing games in which you can not double down on any two cards. You do not want to give the house an even bigger edge, and increase your chances of losing money. Follow basic strategy when playing blackjack including its rules for doubling down. Avoid blackjack games that restrict your doubling down despite the illusion they are doing you a favor by allowing you to still double on totals of 10 or 11.

Keep an Eye Out for: House Rules to Look Out for Part III: Restrictions on Splitting

Leave a Reply